RSA opens anti-fraud center at Purdue University
Posted on 19 December 2012.
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RSA, the security division of EMC, announced the opening of a new RSA Anti Fraud Command Center (AFCC) in collaboration with Purdue University.

The RSA AFCC is a 24x7 services operation staffed by expertly trained fraud analysts who work to detect, track, block and shut down phishing, pharming and mobile-app based attacks perpetrated by online fraudsters.

The Purdue-based RSA AFCC will leverage the existing relationships RSA has with more than 13,000 web hosting service providers, leading browser developers and ISPs to help ensure the fastest blocking and shut down of phishing sites.

Located close to the main campus at the Purdue Research Park in West Lafayette, Indiana, the new RSA AFCC will also be a 24x7 organization supporting the RSA FraudAction services globally.

The organization will be staffed by highly-qualified students in the computer science department at Purdue University who will be fully trained, supervised and supported by RSA staff to identify and shut down fraudulent phishing sites, deploy countermeasures, and conduct extensive forensic work to help stop online criminals and prevent future attacks and fraudulent activity against RSA FraudAction customers.

"As online fraud becomes more sophisticated and prevalent, the demand for our RSA FraudAction services continues to grow. By opening a new RSA AFCC facility at Purdue, we are not only expanding our base of security analysts and experts that are equipped to fight cybercriminals, but by working with the students we are helping to foster the next generation of security professionals emerging from the University," said Alon Shmilovitz, Head of the RSA Anti-Fraud Command Center.

"EMC's presence on campus benefits both faculty and students, and gives students the real-world experience they need to be successful in their careers. EMC is a leader in its educational vision and in working with Purdue to help students prepare for the jobs they'll have after they graduate," concluded Dr. Gerry McCartney, VP and CIO of Purdue University.





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