Ubuntu comes to the phone
Posted on 02 January 2013.
Canonical announced a smartphone interface for its operating system, Ubuntu, using all four edges of the screen for a more immersive experience. Ubuntu gives handset OEMs and mobile operators the ability to converge phone, PC and thin client into a single enterprise superphone.


Ubuntu is aimed at two core mobile segments: the high-end superphone, and the entry-level basic smartphone, helping operators grow the use of data amongst consumers who typically use only the phone and messaging but who might embrace the use of web and email on their phone. Ubuntu also appeals to aspirational prosumers who want a fresh experience with faster, richer performance on a lower bill-of-materials device.

The handset interface for Ubuntu introduces distinctive new user experiences to the mobile market, including:

1. Edge magic: thumb gestures from all four edges of the screen enable users to find content and switch between apps faster than other phones.

2. Deep content immersion - controls appear only when the user wants them.

3. A beautiful global search for apps, content and products.

4. Voice and text commands in any application for faster access to rich capabilities.

5. Both native and web or HTML5 apps.

6. Evolving personalised art on the welcome screen.

Ubuntu offers compelling customisation options for partner apps, content and services. Operators and OEMs can easily add their own branded offerings. Canonicalís personal cloud service, Ubuntu One, provides storage and media services, file sharing and a secure transaction service which enables partners to integrate their own service offerings easily.

Canonical makes it easy to build phones with Ubuntu. The company provides engineering services to offload the complexity of maintaining multiple code bases which has proven to be a common issue for smartphone manufacturers, freeing the manufacturer to focus on hardware design and integration. For silicon vendors, Ubuntu is compatible with a typical Android Board Support Package (BSP). This means Ubuntu is ready to run on the most cost-efficient chipset designs.





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