Many social accounts are still in danger
Posted on 07 May 2013.
The recent hacking of the Associated Press’ Twitter account has begged the question, how secure are social media accounts? A study released by IObit reveals that 30% users always accept “Keep Me Logged-in” when they are logging into Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and other social media sites. The study also found that 10% of users never clear browser cookies and cache.


This data shows that there are still many people who choose “Keep Me Logged-in” features no matter risks they pose to their online privacy and security.

While more and more people are active users of social media and online shopping, it appears many are still not doing enough to protect their personal information and privacy. For example, 45% of people will change their passwords only when they are required to do so, which means that their social media accounts may be suffer from a malicious attack at any time.

Moreover, 15% of people never change their password. At this time, millions of people are still in the danger of having their social accounts attacked and personal information with possibly embarrassing information exposed to the public by hackers.

"This survey is open to all the people all over the world. 10,157 people joined it. Keeping a strong, frequently changed password is the best guardian for one’s social media accounts. It should therefore be taken seriously and kept well protected. However, many people aren't consciously aware that this small activity is threatening their personal privacy and security." said Michael Zhao, Marketing Director at IObit.

"We shouldn’t wait until something bad happens before we take action to protect our accounts. We will continue to remind users about this issue. We have strong confidence that our users will be following best-practices for keeping their privacy and online assets protected. A strong password and a good habit in password management is the simplest and the most effective method," Zhao added.





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